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s.munoz@northeastern.edu

Profile

Samuel Munoz

1 MSC
360 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115

Education

  • PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2015

Research & Scholarship Interests

sedimentary records of environmental change, paleoclimate and climate change, rivers and fluvial processes, hydroclimatic extremes
Affiliated With

Department Research Areas

Selected Publications

  • S.E. Munoz, S.G. Dee, El Niño Increases the Risk of Lower Mississippi River Flooding, Scientific Reports, 7, 2017, 1772
  • J.R. Walsh, S.E. Munoz, M.J. Vander Zanden., Outbreak of an Undetected Invasive Species Triggered by a Climate Anomaly, Ecosphere, 7(12), 2016, 1-17
  • S.E. Munoz, K. Gruley, A. Massie, D.A. Fike, S.S. Schroeder, J.W. Williams, Cahokia’s Emergence and Decline Coincided with Shifts of Flood Frequency on the Mississippi River, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(20), 2015, 6319-6324
  • V.C. Radeloff, J.W. Williams, B.L. Bateman, K.D. Burke, S.K. Carter, E.S. Childress, K.J. Cromwell, C. Gratton, A.O. Hasley, B.M. Kraemer, A.W. Latzka, E. Marin-Spiotta, C.D. Meine, S.E. Munoz, et al., The Rise of Novelty in Ecosystems, Ecological Applications, 25(8), 2015, 2051-2068
  • S.E. Munoz, S. Schroeder, D.A. Fike, J.W. Williams, A Record of Sustained Prehistoric and Historic Land use from the Cahokia Region, Illinois, USA, Geology, 42(6), 2014, 499-502

Related News

May 21, 2018

Congratulations to the four COE teams out of eight total receiving 2018 Seed Grant funding from the Global Resilience Institute (GRI). The resilience project topics range from coastal flooding...

May 15, 2018

MES/CEE Assistant Professor Samuel Munoz will be leading a $595K NSF grant for "Extreme floods on the lower Mississippi River in the context of late Holocene climatic variability" in collaboration with Liviu Giosan and Jeffrey Donnelly from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Zhixiong Shen from Coastal Carolina University.

April 5, 2018

MES/CEE Assistant Professor Samuel Munoz is researching how the re-engineering of the Mississippi River to straighten and challelize it has had the unintended consequences of increasing the risk of severe flooding.