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Applying a Quantitative Toxicogenomic Approach for Mechanistic and Comparative Toxicity Assessment of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials

25
Apr

206 Egan

April 25, 2019 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
April 25, 2019 10:00 am to 12:00 pm

Please join the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering for this upcoming dissertation defense from PhD Student Tao Jiang. Light refreshments will be served prior to the event.

Dissertation Title:

Applying a Quantitative Toxicogenomic Approach for Mechanistic and Comparative Toxicity Assessment of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials

Dissertation Abstract:

The carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs) are among the most crucial and notable nanomaterials along the inception and progression of nanotechnology, the wide applications of which have expedited nanotechnological research and development. The blooming rate in application and production of CNMs in various fields has prompted accompanying rise in public concerns on their possible toxicological risks and implications to human and ecosystem health. However, our understanding on toxicity and potential impacts of CNMs is still in its infancy. This dissertation proposed to employ a newly established high-throughput quantitative toxicogenomics-based 3-dimensional (3-D) protein expression profiling technique with yeast cells to conduct a systematic and comprehensive study in quantitative and mechanistic nanotoxicity assessment of a variety of well-characterized carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs) having different physiochemical and structural properties, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), graphene (oxide), fullerenes and carbon blacks. The aims are to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of action (MOAs) at the molecular level and modes of action (MoAs) at the cellular level of CNMs, to correlate CNMs’ nanotoxicity with their physicochemical and structural properties, and to bridge the knowledge gap and address key challenges in risk and hazard assessment of CNMs.

Biography:

Tao Jiang is a PhD candidate in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Northeastern University. He is advised by Professors April Gu and Annalisa Onnis-Hayden. His research interests focus on environmental toxicology and risk assessment of contaminants of emerging concern to human health and ecological systems. Prior to joining the Civil and Environmental Engineering PhD program, he worked as a research associate at the Chinese Academy of Sciences for one year, and a research/teaching assistant at the University of Pittsburgh for two years. He holds a master’s degree and a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Engineering.